Doc Media Centre newsroom on Higher Education

On 20 November, the Doc Media Centre hosted a newsroom on the future of Higher Education after COVID-19.

Our first guest was Dr. Dawne Irving-Bell (Edge Hill University), founder of the National Teaching Repository. We spoke about Dawne’s inspiration for the NTR, how universities have been transformed by the pandemic, and the future of open educational resources. We also plugged the forthcoming inaugural edition of the Journal of Social Media for Learning, which Dawne will be launching next month.

Interview with John Coster and Dr. Dawne Irving-Bell, 18 November 2020

Our next guest was Professor Richard Hall (De Montfort University), who reflected on how universities have responded to COVID-19, the impact of neoliberal managerialism on the mental health and wellbeing of staff, the hidden cost of academic labour, and the future of Higher Education post-pandemic. We also discussed Richard’s forthcoming book The Hopeless University (to be published in 2021 by Mayfly Press). The full conversation can be viewed here

In conversation with John Coster and Prof. Richard Hall, 20 November 2020

Many thanks to Dawne and Richard for speaking to us. These were two very inspirational ‘in conversations’ that gave John and I a lot of food for thought. We look forward to having you both back at the DMC soon 🙂

#SocMedHE19 Virtual presentation on Twitter and Higher Education teaching

Unfortunately I am unable to attend today’s Social Media for Learning in Higher Education conference at Edge Hill University. Thanks to the conference organisers for allowing me to submit a virtual presentation.  The screencast can be found here and the abstract and slides for my talk are below:

‘Curation, Connectivity and Creativity: Reflections on using Twitter to teach Digital Activism

Dr. Paul Reilly, University of Sheffield

 

How can teachers leverage the connective affordances of Twitter to enhance student learning within Higher Education? How do students respond to content shared on module hashtags? In this virtual presentation, I will consider these questions by discussing my own experience of using Twitter in my Digital Activism modules over the past five years. During this period, I created hashtags such as #actandprotest and #digiadvocates in order to curate digital resources for my students at Leicester and Sheffield, as well as to encourage them to share relevant news items, blogs, and research papers at appropriate points during the course. I will reflect on what I refer to as the three ‘C’s of using Twitter in the context of Higher Education. First, the microblogging site provides unprecedented opportunities for the curation of resources. In the case of my Digital Activism teaching, real-time case studies such as Occupy Wall Street and the ‘Arab Spring’ were integrated into sessions through the use of Twitter to share links to blogs and news media coverage. Second, there is the connection with students who were using links shared on these hashtags to deepen their knowledge about theories such as connective action. Some even went as far as to use #actandprotest and #digiadvocates to share resources they had found with their classmates (and me). Finally, there is the ability to showcase the creativity of the students studying Digital Activism. For example, subvertisements (remixed logos of corporations that critique consumerism) were shared under #digiadvocates with the consent of the students who created them. This received very positive feedback from the class, as well as academics and students who were not enrolled in the module but were following the  hashtag. The presentation concludes by considering how Twitter may be used to support student learning in the future.

The conference programme can be found here and you can follow on Twitter using #SocMedHe19